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Homepage > History of Kyokushin > Steve Arneil

Hanshi Steve Arneil was born in South Africa in 1934. At the age of seventeen he became a black belt in Judo, as well as being reasonably versed in both Kenpo and Karate. In 1962 he travelled to Japan to study karate under Kancho Mas Oyama.

By the time he left Japan in 1965, he had gained the rank of 3rd dan and had been the first person to complete the 100 man kumite after Mas Oyama. Steve Arneil was "adopted" by Mas Oyama, in order to allow Steve to marry a Japanese woman.

Since the founding of the British Karate Kyokushinkai in 1965 we have seen a steady progression in both size and ability of one of the most respected Karate Organisations in Britain. One major reason for this progression lies in the personality and drive of its chief instructor Hanshi Steve Arneil  (9thDan). His depths of knowledge and tireless efforts have developed the unity of the British Karate Kyokushinkai.

Hanshi Arneil spent many years travelling the world, his journey culminating in Japan where he spent many years expanding his knowledge of the Martial Arts. He was also very instrumental in the British Karate scene in the 1970's, where among other things he was coach of the successful British Squad that defeated Japan at the world Tournament.

Steve Arneil 9th Dan Kyokushinkai Karate started in London when Hanshi Steve Arneil and Bob Boulton returned to Great Britain after four years of study at the Kyokushinkai Honbu in Tokyo. The first Kyokushinkai Dojo was the London Karate Kai and this club was soon to become the premier club of Great Britain. In 1965 they founded the British Karate Kyokushinkai.

Within two years the British Karate Kyokushinkai had over 17 students who had qualified as British International Representatives. Hanshi Steve Arneil became the British and English Team Manager and Coach and when the British Karate Team won the World Championship (the first country outside Japan to do so), he won the award for the World's Best Coach.

The British Karate Kyokushinkai now has over 45 Dojos in Great Britain and in 1978 staged the largest Karate Tournament ever to be held in Great Britain at Wembley Stadium. Kyokushinkai is now known for its high standard of Knockdown Tournament fighting which is based on full contact. However, the British Karate Kyokushinkai also competes in Kata Tournaments, Nihon Shobu Tournaments and Clicker style Tournaments (which are a Kyokushinkai innovation).

The British Karate Kyokushinkai is a founding member of the International Federation of Karate and through this organisation will continue to take part in world events with like-minded Kyokushin Karateka.

The British Karate Kyokushinkai is also a founder member of the English Karate Governing Body, English Traditional Karate Body.

The Grading Syllabus is one of the worlds most comprehensive and is administered and controlled in Britain by a highly qualified Board of Examiners.